Where does one human being stand amongst the animals that inhabit the land on which he borrows from them? This question has been at the forefront of the Colorado Wildlife Action Network since their inception. The unique qualities of a land such as Colorado make it necessary to think about the wild inhabitants that make Colorado their home, before any builders or developers can even begin to think about where they are planning on putting their next endeavor. There are over 100  species native to Colorado including, but not limited to:

  1. Black-Tailed Prairie Dog

  2. Shrews

  3. Rusty Crayfish

  4. Cow Bird

  5. Bald Eagle

  6. Greater Sage-Grouse

  7. Porcupine

  8. Muskrat

  9. Brown Creeper

  10. Bonytail

  11. Weasels

  12. Gray Wolf

  13. Zebra & Quagga Mussels

  14. Skunk

  15. Chukar

  16. Ringtail

  17. Burrowing Owl

  18. White-Footed Mice

  19. Black-Footed Ferret

  20. Sandhill Crane

  21. Moose

  22. Eastern Bluebird

  23. Prairie Dogs

  24. Mountain Whitefish

  25. Foxes

  26. Whooping Crane

  27. Bighorn Sheep

  28. Pikeminnow

  29. Mountain Goat

  30. Painted Turtle

  31. Badger

  32. Mourning Dove

  33. Nine-Banded Armadillo

  34. Hares

  35. Ord’s Kangaroo Rat

  36. Lynx

  37. Pronghorn

  38. Cottontails

  39. Bison

  40. Golden Eagle

  41. Cormorant

  42. Greater Prairie-Chicken

  43. Piping Plover

  44. Gray Catbird

  45. Chipmunks

  46. River Otter

  47. Black Bear

  48. Elk

  49. Colorado River Cutthroat Trout

  50. Wolverine

  51. Marten

  52. Woodrats

  53. American Pika

  54. Western Bluebird

  55. Kit Fox

  56. Mountain Chickadee

  57. Bobcat

  58. Razorback Sucker

  59. Raccoon

  60. Pocket Mice

  61. Mountain Plover

  62. Pocket Gophers

  63. Yellow-Bellied Marmot

  64. Greenback Cutthroat Trout

  65. Hispid Cotton Rat

  66. Harvest Mice

  67. Arkansas Darter

  68. Voles/Meadow Mice

  69. Deer

  70. Virginia Opossum

  71. Canada Goose

  72. Peregrine Falcon

  73. Humpback Chub

  74. Dusky Grouse

  75. Gunnison Sage-grouse

  76. Grizzly Bear

  77. Least Tern

  78. Mountain Bluebird

  79. Mountain Lion

  80. Northern Grasshopper Mouse

  81. Crow

  82. Coyote

  83. Plains Sharp-Tailed Grouse

  84. Rio Grande Cutthroat Trout

  85. Columbian Sharp-Tailed Grouse (Mountain)

  86. New Zealand Mudsnail

  87. Black-Capped Chickadee

  88. Beaver

  89. Boreal Toad

  90. Bats

  91. Black-Billed Cuckoo

  92. Eastern Mole

  93. Ground Squirrels

  94. Mink

  95. Lesser Prairie-Chicken

  96. Jumping Mice

  97. Band-Tailed Pigeon

  98. Tree Squirrels

  99. Yellow-Breasted Chat

With such a vast array of species, it’s no wonder that there is such a differing degree of habitats for each one. Wherever a builder is planning on building in Colorado, you can be sure that a native species is inhabiting any area there. If you’re concerned about disturbing the natural habitat of a particular species, be sure to contact your local Colorado Wildlife Action Network before you begin your project to find out if there are any special considerations you need to make before you begin. Together, we can keep Colorado beautiful and keep our native species in their native habitat for a long time to come.

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